About Film

Voices of Resilience: Insight into Injury (Nov. 13th, 10PM on PBS)

Just as PTSD sprang out of the post-Vietnam era, today’s generation of veterans return home to face an invisible wound known as “moral injury” —  a new name for a condition that is as old as the dawn of battle.  Moral Injury, coined by Dr. Jonathan Shay, refers to the painful inner conflict that results from having violated one’s own code of what’s right and wrong in the line of duty.  To some, moral injury is the unacknowledged specter looming over the current U.S. veteran suicide crisis, which claims the lives of 20 individuals every day.  Some of the country’s top experts on moral injury, and well-known champions of veterans issues, share their deepest insights into the nature of this wound, why it’s so pervasive and universally stress the responsibility each of us must bear in helping those who have seen war make meaning of their experience.   Voices of Resilience follows the struggles of a diverse group of veterans, that of a young man from Colorado, and a young couple in Saipan, one of many remote islands in the Pacific, where enlistment rates tend to soar higher than any other community in the U.S. population.  Ultimately, Voices offers inspirational examples of veterans who…

VA Dr. Branson shares why she is championing ALMOST SUNRISE

The film is lovely and its portrayal of returning Veterans heart felt. My experience working clinically with Veterans is often brutal as we resonate with the brutality of their own experience. If we, as providers, can bring our Veterans even minimal  relief, it is worth our discomfort; any effort on our part considering the enormous  sacrifices they have made for us by fighting our ugly wars is our responsibility as providers and as a nation.  That said, I prefer not to attend “Military” movies, especially those made in Hollywood. My work is so very important to me and the only way I can continue to serve our Veterans is by preserving myself.  Managing my own fatigue and burn out is crucial to taking hold of the task at hand. So, when Michael called the Resilience Center to offer us tickets to his film, I declined initially. After-hours for me, are for non-war related activities, not an artistic rendition of my daily life. Michael, however, convinced me that this film was different so I agreed to attend. His film, “Almost Sunrise,” was playing at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival at Lincoln Center, also a significant film festival for me. And…

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